Synsets for "rapacious"

Synset: predatory.s.02

Synonyms: predatory

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: living by preying on other animals especially by catching living prey

Examples: a predatory bird | the rapacious wolf | raptorial birds | ravening wolves | a vulturine taste for offal

Lemmas: predatory rapacious raptorial ravening vulturine vulturous

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: rapacious.s.02

Synonyms: rapacious

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: excessively greedy and grasping

Examples: a rapacious divorcee on the prowl | ravening creditors | paying taxes to voracious governments

Lemmas: rapacious ravening voracious

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: edacious.s.01

Synonyms: edacious

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: devouring or craving food in great quantities

Examples: edacious vultures | a rapacious appetite | ravenous as wolves | voracious sharks

Lemmas: edacious esurient rapacious ravening ravenous voracious wolfish

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Beyhan Sultan (daughter of Selim I) Ferhat was executed on the grounds of rapacious and ruthless conduct in the provinces which he was assigned.
Vincent Peranio Peranio's first credited project is the creation of "Lobstora", a room-sized rapacious lobster in Waters' "Multiple Maniacs" (1970).
Álvaro Obregón, Mexico City The fauna was very varied in prehispanic times, but most of the species have become extinct. The mountain fauna was particularly rich in precious and rapacious birds.
Richard Wetzel Rapacious flowers and other vegetation, painted large—as if from an insect's point of view—loom large against dark pastoral landscapes in Richard D. Wetzel's exhibition …
Viking Age Vikings were portrayed as uniformly violent and bloodthirsty by their enemies. The chronicles of medieval England portrayed them as rapacious "wolves among sheep".
Cerberus Virgil described Cerberus as "ravenous" ("fame rabida"), and a rapacious Cerberus became proverbial. Thus Cerberus came to symbolize avarice, and so, for example, in Dante's "Inferno," Cerberus is placed in the Third Circle of Hell, guarding over the gluttons, where he "rends the spirits, flays and quarters them," and Dante (perhaps echoing Servius' association of Cerbeus with earth) has his guide Virgil take up handfuls of earth and throw them into Cerberus' "rapacious gullets."
Anti-Indian sentiment The Hindu organisations Hindu Janjagruti Samiti (HJS) and Shiv Sena protested against the film for its portrayal of the Hindu God Rama. The film depicted Hindu society as rapacious monsters
Don Cummings "The Winner" (one act) is about the destruction of the earth by rapacious big-oil, was produced at West Coast Ensemble, a finalist for the Heideman Award at Actors Theatre of Louisville and was published in "Post_Road_(magazine)", Issue #25.
John Hopkins (died 1732) John "Vulture" Hopkins ( 1663 – 25 April 1732) was a merchant in London, and a Whig politician. He had an undistinguished career in Parliament for 12 years, but is better known for his miserliness and rapacious business practices.
Lajos Kossuth "...the popular Kossuth fever of the time to ignorance of he man in whom they [the Americans] see a second Washington, when the fact is that he is an ambitious and rapacious humbug."
Werewolf fiction A rapacious female werewolf who appears in the guise of a seductive femme fatale before transforming into lupine form to devour her hapless male victims is the protagonist of Clemence Housman's acclaimed "The Were-wolf" published in 1896.
Legacy of the Aldenata With the Earth in the path of the rapacious Posleen, the peaceful and friendly races of the Galactic Federation offer their resources to help the backward Terrans—for a price.
The Tower of Lies Jan (Lon Chaney) is a Swedish farmer and Glory (Norma Shearer) is his beloved daughter, who saves him from bankruptcy by eloping to the big city with their rapacious landlord, driving Jan to madness.
John Acton (canon lawyer) Frederic William Maitland wrote of Acton that he was "a little too human to be strictly scientific. His gloss often becomes a growl against the bad world in which he lives, the greedy prelates, the hypocritical friars, the rapacious officials."
Gray Wolves (Chicago) Lincoln Steffens, a muck-raking reporter from "McClure's Magazine" was the first to describe these aldermen as gray wolves "for the color of their hair and the rapacious cunning and greed of their natures."
Ascension frigatebird The names "frigatebird" and "Fregata" derive from the French mariners' name for the bird "La Frégate", a frigate or fast warship. The specific "aquila" is Latin for an eagle, and refers to the dark plumage and rapacious habits."
Abuna Qerellos III Qerellos III was an Abuna, or head of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church (1816 - 1828?). In the words of Richard Pankhurst, "A controversial figure, he is reputed to have been fanatical and rapacious."
Baltimore oriole Predation is a common source of mortality, typically also occurring with eggs, nestlings and fledgings. Common predators at Baltimore oriole nests can include common grackles, American crows, Blue Jays, black-billed magpies, tree squirrels and domestic cats, which most commonly capture newly fledged orioles or adults engaged in brooding behavior. Rapacious birds commonly prey on both young and fully-grown orioles, the most prolific being the eastern screech owl and Cooper's and sharp-shinned hawks. Somewhat larger rapacious birds also sometimes opportunistically predate the oriole, including peregrine falcons, great horned owls, and barn owls, while merlins may do so while orioles are migrating.
Charles F. Price "In Where the Water-Dogs Laughed" (2003), Price continues the time-line of his family, intertwining a Cherokee myth about a giant bear with the real-life problems the Southern Appalachian farmers faced at the hand of rapacious loggers. Hunter James, reviewer for the "Winston-Salem Journal", wrote that this book “brilliantly mines the legends and history of the Southern mountains”
Celestial Emporium of Benevolent Knowledge Wilkins, a 17th-century philosopher, had proposed a universal language based on a classification system that would encode a description of the thing a word describes into the word itself—for example, "Zi" identifies the genus "beasts"; "Zit" denotes the "difference" "rapacious beasts of the dog kind"; and finally "Zitα" specifies "dog".