Synsets for "hitch"

Synset: enlistment.n.01

Synonyms: enlistment

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: a period of time spent in military service

Examples:

Lemmas: enlistment hitch term_of_enlistment tour_of_duty duty_tour tour

Hypernym: time_period

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: arrest.n.02

Synonyms: arrest

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: the state of inactivity following an interruption

Examples: the negotiations were in arrest | held them in check | during the halt he got some lunch | the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow | he spent the entire stop in his seat

Lemmas: arrest check halt hitch stay stop stoppage

Hypernym: inaction

Hyponym: countercheck logjam

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hang-up.n.02

Synonyms: hang-up

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: an unforeseen obstacle

Examples:

Lemmas: hang-up hitch rub snag

Hypernym: obstacle

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitch.n.04

Synonyms: hitch

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: a connection between a vehicle and the load that it pulls

Examples:

Lemmas: hitch

Hypernym: connection

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitch.n.05

Synonyms: hitch

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it; a temporary knot

Examples:

Lemmas: hitch

Hypernym: knot

Hyponym: Blackwall_hitch cat's-paw rolling_hitch sheet_bend timber_hitch

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hindrance.n.02

Synonyms: hindrance

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome

Examples:

Lemmas: hindrance hinderance hitch preventive preventative encumbrance incumbrance interference

Hypernym: obstruction

Hyponym: clog speed_bump

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitch.n.07

Synonyms: hitch

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg

Examples:

Lemmas: hitch hobble limp

Hypernym: gait

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitch.v.01

Synonyms: hitch

Part of Speech: VERB

Definition: to hook or entangle

Examples: One foot caught in the stirrup

Lemmas: hitch catch

Hypernym: attach

Hyponym: snag

Antonyms: unhitch

    

Synset: limp.v.01

Synonyms: limp

Part of Speech: VERB

Definition: walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury

Examples: The old woman hobbles down to the store every day

Lemmas: limp gimp hobble hitch

Hypernym: walk

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: buck.v.04

Synonyms: buck

Part of Speech: VERB

Definition: jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched

Examples: the yung filly bucked

Lemmas: buck jerk hitch

Hypernym: move

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitchhike.v.01

Synonyms: hitchhike

Part of Speech: VERB

Definition: travel by getting free rides from motorists

Examples:

Lemmas: hitchhike hitch thumb

Hypernym: ride

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: hitch.v.05

Synonyms: hitch

Part of Speech: VERB

Definition: connect to a vehicle: "hitch the trailer to the car"

Examples:

Lemmas: hitch

Hypernym: connect

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Lobster buoy hitch The lobster buoy hitch is similar to the buntline hitch, but made with a cow hitch around the standing part rather than a clove hitch.
Taut-line hitch The adjustable loop forms of the rolling hitch and Magnus hitch, in addition to being called either of those two names, have also come to be known variously as the taut-line hitch, tent-line hitch, rigger's hitch, adjustable hitch, or midshipman's hitch. These knots are generally shown as being based on one of three underlying hitches: two variants of the rolling hitch (ABOK #1734 and #1735) and the Magnus hitch (#1736).
Half hitch One instance where a half hitch stands on its own without additional embellishment is when added to a timber hitch to help stabilize a load in the direction of pull. A timber hitch is tied on the far end of the load to bind it securely and a half hitch made at the forward end to serve as a guide for the rope. In this instance, the half hitch combined with a timber hitch is known as a killick hitch or kelleg hitch.
Killick hitch The killick hitch is a type of hitch knot used to attach a rope to oddly shaped objects. This knot is also known as the kelleg hitch. It is a combination of a timber hitch tied in conjunction with a half hitch, which is added to lend support and stability when pulling or hoisting the object; the addition of a half-hitch in front of the timber hitch creates a timber hitch and a half hitch, known as a killick hitch when at sea. A killick is "a small anchor or weight for mooring a boat, sometimes consisting of a stone secured by pieces of wood".
Buntline hitch The buntline hitch is simply a clove hitch tied around the standing part, with the turns of the clove hitch progressing towards the object.
Running highwayman's hitch The running highwayman's hitch, mooring hitch, or sliding sheet bend is a hitch knot tied by looping the end of the rope around an object, and then fixing it to the standing part with a highwayman's hitch.
Magnus hitch The magnus hitch is a knot similar to a rolling hitch or clove hitch, used to tie a rope or line to a pole, spar, or another line. It is tied similarly to a rolling hitch but with the final hitch in the opposite direction. It can be more tricky to snug up, since both lines emerge from the same side of the hitch, but it has less tendency to twist under load.
Knute hitch The Knute hitch is used to attach a lanyard of small stuff to a marlingspike or other tool. Rigger Brion Toss named the hitch after his favourite marlingspike of the same name, although the hitch is likely much older.
Tugboat hitch The Tugboat hitch (a.k.a. Backhanded mooring hitch or Lighterman's Hitch) is a knot ideal for heavy towing, or making fast to a post, bollard, or winch. It is easy to release, even under great load.
Tumble hitch The Notable Knot Index recommends the tumble hitch as a more stable hitch than the highwayman's hitch. It is a similar hitch, but less prone to capsizing because the standing part remains passive and the locking is done by two successive bights of the working part being pushed into the previous bight thus locking it.
Gregory Wale Gregory Wale married his second wife Elizabeth Hitch and they had a son called Hitch Wale (born 1711). Elizabeth was the daughter of Captain Thomas Hitch.
Highpoint hitch The highpoint hitch (or high post hitch) is a type of knot used to attach a rope to an object. The main feature of the hitch is that it is very secure, yet if tied as a slipped knot it can be released quickly and easily with one pull, even after heavy loading. The highpoint hitch is a buntline hitch with an extra half turn, making it more secure.
Rolling hitch The rolling hitch is a knot (see also Magnus hitch) used to attach a rope to a rod, pole, or another rope. A simple friction hitch, it is used for lengthwise pull along an object rather than at right angles. The rolling hitch is designed to resist lengthwise movement for only a single direction of pull.
Sailor's hitch The sailor's hitch is a type of knot, which is a secure, jam-proof hitch. It is a type of knot that is defined as a type of hitch knot. A hitch is a type of knot that has the ability to fit to the size and shape of an object that it is being tied to.
Snuggle hitch Start by tying a clove hitch around the spar or pole. Then make an additional turn around with the working end, in the same direction as the turns forming the clove hitch. Now, tuck the working end under the standing part of the original clove hitch. Pull up tight to complete the hitch.
Rolling hitch At the turn of the 19th century the knot now known as the "rolling hitch" was called the "Magnus hitch" or "Magner's hitch", and the name "rolling hitch" referred to two round turns and two half-hitches. In 1841 Richard Henry Dana, Jr. used the present-day names in his work "The Seaman's Friend", and subsequent authors have continued to use this terminology.
Clove hitch The clove hitch is a type of knot. Along with the bowline and the sheet bend, it is often considered one of the most important knots and is commonly referred to as a Double Hitch. A clove hitch is two successive half-hitches around an object. It is most effectively used as a crossing knot. It can be used as a binding knot, but is not particularly secure in that role. A clove hitch made around the rope's own standing part is known as either two half-hitches or buntline hitch, depending on whether the turns of the clove hitch progress away from or towards the hitched object.
Timber hitch As the name suggests, this knot is often used by lumbermen and arborists for attaching ropes to tree trunks, branches, and logs. For stability when towing or lowering long items, the addition of a half-hitch in front of the timber hitch creates a timber hitch and a half hitch, or known as a killick hitch when at sea. A killick is "a small anchor or weight for mooring a boat, sometimes consisting of a stone secured by pieces of wood". This can also prevent the timber hitch from rolling.
Nathaniel Hitch Nathaniel Hitch was born in Ware, Hertfordshire in 1845, his father being George Hitch, a joiner, carpenter and builder by trade.
Pipe hitch A pipe hitch is a hitch-type knot used to secure smooth cylindrical objects, such as pipes, poles, beams, or spars.