Synsets for "gay liberation movement"

Synset: gay_liberation_movement.n.01

Synonyms: gay_liberation_movement

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: the movement aimed at liberating homosexuals from legal or social or economic oppression

Examples:

Lemmas: gay_liberation_movement gay_lib

Hypernym: campaign

Hyponym:

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Gay liberation Although the term gay liberation may in certain contexts refer to the activities of radical gay advocacy groups during the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, often the term refers more broadly to the movement to free gay men and lesbians (and often closely associated social groups such as bisexual people or transgender people) from social and legal oppression. Sometimes the term gay liberation movement is even used synonymously or interchangeably with the term gay rights movement. Thus, when used in this way, "gay liberation" refers to a universal and ongoing social movement not limited to any particular time or place.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table In the early 1970s, the GLBTRT (then called the Task Force on Gay Liberation) campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).
Stormé DeLarverie DeLarverie's role in the Gay liberation movement lasted long after the uprisings of 1969.
Barbara Love Sidney Abbott and Love were among the first feminists to join the gay liberation movement.
Libraries and the LGBTQ community In the early 1970s, the Task Force on Gay Liberation campaigned to have books about the gay liberation movement at the Library of Congress reclassified from HQ 71–471 (“Abnormal Sexual Relations, Including Sexual Crimes”). In 1972, after receiving a letter requesting the reclassification, the Library of Congress agreed to make the shift, reclassifying those books into a newly created category, HQ 76.5 (“Homosexuality, Lesbianism—Gay Liberation Movement, Homophile Movement”).
Civil rights movements The words "Gay Liberation" echoed "Women's Liberation"; the Gay Liberation Front consciously took its name from the "National Liberation Fronts" of Vietnam and Algeria, and the slogan "Gay Power", as a defiant answer to the rights-oriented homophile movement, was inspired by Black Power and Chicano Power. The GLF's statement of purpose explained: GLF activist Martha Shelley wrote,
LGBT history in the United States In the late 1960s, the more socialistic "liberation" philosophy that had started to create different factions within the Civil Rights Movement, Black Power movement, anti-war movement, and Feminist movement, also engulfed the homophile movement. A new generation of young gay and lesbian Americans saw their struggle within a broader movement to dismantle racism, sexism, western imperialism, and traditional mores regarding drugs and sexuality. This new perspective on Gay Liberation had a major turning point with the Stonewall riots in 1969.
Lesbian feminism Lesbian feminism came together in the early 1970s out of dissatisfaction with second-wave feminism and the gay liberation movement.
Civil rights movements By the late 1970s, the radicalism of Gay Liberation was eclipsed by a return to a more formal movement that became known as the Gay and Lesbian Rights Movement.
Gay Liberation Front The Stonewall riots are considered by many to be the prime catalyst for the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States.
Gay liberation Few areas in the U.S. saw a more diverse mix of subcultures than Greenwich Village, which was host to the gay street youth. A group of young, effeminate runaways, shunned by their families, society, and the gay community, they reflected the countercultural movement more than any other homosexual group. Refusing to hide their homosexuality, they were brutalised, rebellious tearaways who took drugs, fought, shoplifted and hustled older gay men in order to survive. Their age, behaviour, feminine attire and conduct left them isolated from the rest of the gay scene, but living close to the streets, they made the perfect warriors for the imminent Stonewall Riots. These emerging social possibilities, combined with the new social movements such as Black Power, women's liberation, and the student insurrection of May 1968 in France, heralded a new era of radicalism. After the Stonewall riots in New York City in late June 1969 many within the emerging gay liberation movement in the U.S. saw themselves as connected with the New Left rather than the established homophile groups of the time. The words "gay liberation" echoed "women's liberation"; the Gay Liberation Front consciously took its name from the National Liberation Fronts of Vietnam and Algeria; and the slogan "Gay Power", as a defiant answer to the rights-oriented homophile movement, was inspired by Black Power, which was a response to the civil rights movement.
Rita Mae Brown She was involved in the Redstockings, but also left the group because of their lack of involvement in lesbian rights. She then went on to join the Gay Liberation Front, where she suggested the formation all-lesbian group, since many of the women felt excluded from the feminist movement and the male-led gay liberation movement.
Cottaging Before the gay liberation movement, cottages were amongst the few places where men too young to get into gay bars could meet others who they knew for sure to be gay.
Spectrum Center (community center) Initially, on March 17, 1970, following the creation of the Detroit Gay Liberation Movement a few weeks earlier, both students and members of the larger community came together to initiate the University of Michigan chapter of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF), seeking to battle stereotypes of gay people, fighting homophobic prejudice, and invalidating the mental illness model of homosexuality.
Rites (magazine) An expressly political magazine, "Rites" was published to further lesbian and gay liberation, feminism and progressive social change. The "Rites" collective saw the magazine as part of building an active lesbian and gay liberation movement. "Rites" was committed to cross-Canada coverage and the equal involvement of lesbians and gay men in all aspects of the magazine's production.
A Very Natural Thing Some gay film critics felt that film was not political enough: that the characters were too apolitical, too middle class and that, by rejecting the philosophy of free love or sexual liberation, the film was rejecting what some gay activists felt was a necessary value of the new gay liberation movement.
Pride Week 1973 The Pride Week of 1973 marks the shift in Vancouver from the homophile movement into the gay liberation movement. The essence of the homophile movement is that of assimilation into the general society as well as the creation of hidden network for gays and lesbians to meet one another and form a community. The gay liberation movement is more active and aims to achieve change through visibility and protest. Pride Week 1973 was clearly a visible event aiming for openness and change, it was also the first one of its kind and is therefore a tangible shift of the mentality of the gay rights movement.
David Thorstad He was also active in Trotskyist politics for some years. For more than six years, Thorstad was a member of the Upper West Side branch of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP), and a staff writer for its newspaper, "The Militant". He left the SWP in December 1973, citing the organization's lack of enthusiasm for the gay liberation movement and failure to develop a "Marxist materialist analysis" of it. In 1976 he self-published a collection of internal party documents relating to its discussion of the gay liberation movement, under the title "Gay Liberation and Socialism: Documents from the Discussions on Gay Liberation Inside the Socialist Workers Party (1970-1973)". In the early 1970s Thorstad was president of the Gay Activists Alliance, a leading gay liberation group in New York.
Stonewall (2015 film) The drama is set in and around the 1969 Stonewall riots, the violent clash with police that kicked off the gay liberation movement in New York City.
Jim Toy Jim Toy identified as being gay during his speech at an anti-Vietnam-War rally in Kennedy Square, Detroit, in April 1970. At the rally Toy was representing the Detroit Gay Liberation Movement, of which he was a founding member.