Synsets for "basipetal"

Synset: basipetal.a.01

Synonyms: basipetal

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: of leaves or flowers; developing or opening in succession from apex to base

Examples:

Lemmas: basipetal

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: acropetal

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Cholodny–Went model A study of "Arabidopsis" reported in 2000 showed that basipetal (from the tip) transport of auxin controlled gravitropic responses in the roots of these plants.
Phototropism In the fourth model it shows the plant receiving light to inhibit auxin basipetal down to the exposed side, causing the auxin to only flow down the shaded side.
Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris The microconidia are ellipsoidal and either have no septum or a single one. They are formed from phialides in false heads by basipetal division. They are important in secondary infection.
Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense The microconidia are ellipsoidal and have either a single septum or none at all. They are formed from phialides in false heads by basipetal division. They are important in secondary infection.
Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceris The macroconidia are straight to slightly curved, slender, thin walled usually with three or four septa, a foot-shaped basal cell and a tapered and curved apical cell. They are generally produced from phialides on conidiophores by basipetal division. They are important in secondary infection.
Inflorescence In determinate inflorescences the terminal flower is usually the first to mature (precursive development), while the others tend to mature starting from the bottom of the stem. This pattern is called acropetal maturation. When flowers start to mature from the top of the stem, maturation is basipetal, while when the central mature first, divergent.
Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. cubense The macroconidia are nearly straight, slender and thin-walled. They usually have three or four septa, a foot-shaped basal cell and a curved and tapered apical cell. They are generally produced from phialides on conidiophores by basipetal division. They are important in secondary infection.
Harpellales The Harpellales are an order of fungi classified in the subdivision Kickxellomycotina. Thalli are either unbranched or branched, producing basipetal series of trichospores. Zygospores are biconical. Species in the order are found attached to the gut lining of aquatic larvae of Insecta or (rarely) Isopoda. Harpellales are divided into two families, the Harpellaceae and the Legeriomycetaceae. According to the "Dictionary of the Fungi" (10th edition, 2008), the order contains 38 genera and 200 species. The order was formally described in 1978 "Mycotaxon" publication.
Acrophialophora fusispora "Acrophialophora fusispora" is similar to "Paecilomyces", but differ in the presence of pigmented, warted conidiophores, verticillate phialides in limited numbers with narrowing tip, and frequent sympodial proliferation. "A." "fusispora" is distinguished by its pigmented fusiform conidia, which are covered by spiral bands, measuring 5-12 x 3-6μm. The conidia arises in long single-cell basipetal chains, ranging from colorless to pale-brown and broadly ellipsoidal to lemon-shaped. The conidiophores arise singly, terminally, and laterally from the hyphae, and are erect or ascending, straight or flexuous, smooth or rough, and septate. Moreover, the conidiophores are thick-walled with brown at the base and pale towards the apex. The conidiophores are up to 1.5μm long and 2-5μm wide, with whorls of phialides at the end. The phialides are flask-shaped and swollen near the base, with a long, narrow neck, and hyaline, smooth or spiny wall. The phialides are borne on conidiophores, or sometimes, on vegetative hyphae, with the broadest part measuring 9-15μm x 3-4.5μm.
Telopea truncata Flowering occurs from October to January, and is related to altitude: plants at lower elevations flower earlier than ones higher up. The flower heads, known as inflorescences, are terminal—that is, they arise on the ends of small branches—and are surrounded by small inconspicuous hairy bracts. This sets "T. truncata" apart from all other waratah species, which have hairless bracts. In the shape of a flattened raceme, the flower heads are in diameter and composed of 10 to 35 individual flowers. They are most commonly bright red, though scattered yellow-flowered plants occur. These were described as forma "lutea" but are mere colour variations and not genetically distinct. Yellow-flowered plants have both red- and yellow-flowered progeny. Anthesis is basipetal; that is, the flowers at the base (edges) of the flower head open first. The flower is composed of a 2 cm-long perianth on a 1 cm-long stalk, with a pronounced kink in the style above the ovary; all other waratah species have gently incurving styles. Anatomically, the individual flower bears a sessile anther (that is, it lacks a filament), which lies next to the stigma at the end of the style. The ovary lies at the base of the style and atop a stalk known as the gynophore, and it is from here that the seed pod then develops. Meanwhile, a crescent-shaped nectary lies at the base of the gynophore.