Synsets for "relative"

Synset: relative.n.01

Synonyms: relative

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: a person related by blood or marriage

Examples: police are searching for relatives of the deceased | he has distant relations back in New Jersey

Lemmas: relative relation

Hypernym: person

Hyponym: agnate ancestor blood_relation cousin descendant enate in-law kin kinsman kinswoman kissing_cousin next_of_kin offspring second_cousin sibling spouse

Antonyms:

    

Synset: relative.n.02

Synonyms: relative

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: an animal or plant that bears a relationship to another (as related by common descent or by membership in the same genus)

Examples:

Lemmas: relative congener congenator congeneric

Hypernym: organism

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: relative.a.01

Synonyms: relative

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: estimated by comparison; not absolute or complete

Examples: a relative stranger

Lemmas: relative comparative

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: absolute

    

Synset: proportional.s.01

Synonyms: proportional

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: properly related in size or degree or other measurable characteristics; usually followed by `to'

Examples: the punishment ought to be proportional to the crime | earnings relative to production

Lemmas: proportional relative

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Relative pronoun For more information on the formation and uses of relative clauses—with and without relative pronouns—see Relative clause. For detailed information about relative clauses and relative pronouns in English, see English relative clause.
English relative clauses Restrictive relative clauses are also called integrated relative clauses, defining relative clauses, or identifying relative clauses. Conversely, non-restrictive relative clauses are called supplementary, appositive, non-defining or non-identifying relative clauses.
Reduced relative clause Reduced relative clauses have no such relative pronoun or complementizer introducing them. The example below contrasts an English non-reduced relative clause and reduced relative clause.
Relative pronoun Not all relative clauses contain relative pronouns. Some languages, such as Mandarin Chinese, do not have relative pronouns at all, and form relative clauses (or their equivalents) by different methods – these are described in detail in the article on relative clauses. English can also make relative clauses without relative pronouns in some cases. For example, in "The man you saw yesterday was my uncle", the relative clause "you saw yesterday" contains no relative pronoun. It can be said to have a gap, or zero, in the position of the object of the verb "saw".
Relative clause Contrary to English, the relative pronoun can never be omitted in French, not even when the relative clause is embedded in another relative clause.
Relative pronoun A relative pronoun marks a relative clause; it has the same referent in the main clause of a sentence that the relative modifies.
Relative clause If the English relative pronoun would be the subject of an intransitive or passive verb, in Hawaiian a participle is used instead of a full relative clause: "the people fallen" instead of "the people who fell"; "the thing given" instead of "the thing that was given". But when the relative clause's antecedent is a person, the English relative pronoun would be the subject of the relative clause, and the relative clause's verb is active and transitive, a relative clause is used and it begins with the relative pronoun "nana": "The one who me (past) sent" = "the one who sent me".
Specific relative angular momentum The specific relative angular momentum is defined as the cross product of the relative position vector formula_6 and the relative velocity vector formula_7.
Relative clause In Latin, relative clauses follow the noun phrases they modify, and are always introduced using relative pronouns. Relative pronouns, like other pronouns in Latin, agree with their antecedents in gender and number, but not in case: a relative pronoun's case reflects its role in the relative clause it introduces, while its antecedent's case reflects the antecedent's role in the clause that contains the relative clause. (Nonetheless, it is possible for the pronoun and antecedent to be in the same case.) For example:
Relative angular momentum In celestial mechanics, the relative angular momentum (formula_1) of an orbiting body (formula_2) relative to a central body (formula_3) is the moment of (formula_2)'s relative linear momentum:
Relative and absolute tense What is normally encompassed by the term "relative tense" is broken down by Bernard Comrie into "strict relative tense" and "absolute-relative tense".
Relative and absolute tense Comrie's "strict relative tense" expresses time relative to the reference point provided by the context, without indicating where that reference point lies relative to the present time.
Relative and absolute tense A further distinction has also been made between "strict relative" tense, which merely expresses time relative to the reference point, and "absolute-relative tense" (such as pluperfect), which expresses time relative the reference point while also placing the reference point in time relative to the present moment.
Reduced relative clause In languages with head-final relative clauses, such as Chinese, Japanese, and Turkish, non-reduced relative clauses may also cause temporary ambiguity because the complementizer does not precede the relative clause (and thus a person reading or hearing the relative clause has no "warning" that they are in a relative clause).
Relative strength index The relative strength factor is then converted to a relative strength index between 0 and 100:
Relative change and difference As with relative change, the relative difference is undefined if is zero.
Relative strength index The ratio of these averages is the "relative strength" or "relative strength factor":
Relative density Further manipulation and finally substitution of "RD", the true relative density (the subscript V is used because this is often referred to as the relative density "in vacuo"), for "ρ"/"ρ" gives the relationship between apparent and true relative density.
Relative permittivity The relative permittivity of a material for a frequency of zero is known as its static relative permittivity.
Relative clause Japanese does not employ relative pronouns to relate relative clauses to their antecedents. Instead, the relative clause directly modifies the noun phrase as an attributive verb, occupying the same syntactic space as an attributive adjective (before the noun phrase).