Synsets for "possessive"

Synset: genitive.n.01

Synonyms: genitive

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: the case expressing ownership

Examples:

Lemmas: genitive genitive_case possessive possessive_case

Hypernym: oblique

Hyponym: attributive_genitive

Antonyms:

    

Synset: possessive.a.01

Synonyms: possessive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: serving to express or indicate possession

Examples: possessive pronouns | the genitive endings

Lemmas: possessive genitive

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: possessive.s.02

Synonyms: possessive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: desirous of owning

Examples: small children are so possessive they will not let others play with their toys

Lemmas: possessive

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: possessive.s.03

Synonyms: possessive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: having or showing a desire to control or dominate

Examples: a possessive parent

Lemmas: possessive

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Possessive determiner Possessive determiners commonly have similar forms to personal pronouns. In addition, they have corresponding possessive pronouns, which are also phonetically similar. The following chart shows the English, German, and French personal pronouns, possessive determiners and possessive pronouns.
Possessive determiner Some languages have no distinctive possessive adjectives, and express possession by declining personal pronouns in the genitive or possessive case, or by using possessive suffixes or particles. In Japanese, for example, "boku no" (a word for "I" coupled with the genitive particle "no"), is used for "my" or "mine". In Mandarin Chinese, the possessive adjective and possessive pronoun take the same form as each other: the form associated with "wǒ" ("I") is "wǒ de" ("my", "mine"), where "de" is the possessive particle.
Possessive determiner Possessive determiners (possessive adjectives) have features of both determiners and adjectives:
Otjiherero Grammar Possessive determiners are composed of two parts: a possessive concord prefixed to a possessive suffix. Possessive concords correspond to the noun class of the noun being possessed, while the possessive suffix corresponds to the noun class of the possessor.
Russian declension Unlike English, Russian uses the same form for a possessive adjective and the corresponding possessive pronoun. In Russian grammar they are called possessive pronouns (compare with possessive adjectives like Peter's = петин above). The following rules apply:
Russian grammar Unlike English, Russian uses the same form for a possessive adjective and the corresponding possessive pronoun. In Russian grammar they are called possessive pronouns притяжательные местоимения (compare with possessive adjectives like Peter's = петин above). The following rules apply:
English possessive Unlike with other noun phrases which only have a single possessive form, personal pronouns in English have two possessive forms: possessive determiners (used to form noun phrases such as ""her" success") and possessive pronouns (used in place of nouns as in "I prefer "hers"", and also in predicative expressions as in "the success was "hers""). In most cases these are different from each other.
Teochew dialect Teochew does not distinguish the possessive pronouns from the possessive adjectives. As a general rule, the possessive pronouns or adjectives are formed by adding the genitive or possessive marker [kai5] to their respective personal pronouns, as summarised below:
East Ambae language Possessive suffixes are attached to the head noun in a direct possessive construction, or a relational classifier in an indirect possessive construction.
Pashto grammar In phrases that start with the possessive phrase د [də] plus noun, the possessive phrase [də/د] can be substituted for with a weak possessive pronouns.
Head (linguistics) For instance, in the English possessive case, possessive marking ("s") appears on the dependent (the possessor), whereas in Hungarian possessive marking appears on the head noun:
Possessive Some authors who classify both sets of words as "possessive pronouns" or "genitive pronouns" apply the terms dependent/independent or weak/strong to refer, respectively, to "my", "your", etc. and "mine", "yours", etc. Thus "my" is termed a "dependent" (or "weak") "possessive pronoun", while "mine" is an "independent" (or "strong") "possessive pronoun". Also, the first set may be called "adjectival" and the second set "substantival" possessive pronouns.
Honorifics (linguistics) The construction of possessive classifiers depends on ownership, temporality, degrees of control, locative associations, and status. In addition to status-rising and status-lowering possessive classifiers, there are also common (non-status marked) possessive classifiers. Status-rising and status-lowering possessive classifiers have different properties of control and temporality. Common possessive classifiers are divided into three main categories – relatives, personal items, and food/drink.
Possessive According to the "OED", the first reference to possessive pronouns is found in 1530; the first use of "possessive" as a noun occurs in 1591, the first use of "possessive case" (which notes that it is like the Latin genitive, and may be called the genitive case in reference to English also) occurs in 1763, and the first use of "possessive adjective" dates from 1870.
Adang language Adang has many independent pronouns, organized in six paradigms. Two of these paradigms are of independent possessive pronouns, one occurring with alienable nouns and another fulfilling a contrastive function in combination with alienable nouns (with or without regular possessive pronoun) or inalienable nouns (with a possessive prefix). Contrastive possessive pronouns are also used without a noun. Besides regular possessive pronouns and contrastive possessive pronouns (see Possession), the four other paradigms are: subject pronouns, object pronouns, numbered pronouns and alone pronouns.
Hawaiian grammar To pluralize nouns marked with a possessive, add "mau" between the possessive and the noun.
The Bluejacket's Manual In 1938, the title was changed from singular possessive to plural possessive: "Bluejackets"'.
Possessive Some languages have no distinct possessive determiners as such, instead using a pronoun together with a possessive particle – a grammatical particle used to indicate possession. For example, in Japanese, "my" or "mine' can be expressed as "watashi no", where "watashi" means "I" and "no" is the possessive particle. Similarly in Mandarin Chinese, "my" or "mine" is "wǒ de", where "wǒ" means "I" and "de" is the possessive particle.
Halkomelem The following table lists the possessive affixes which appear in attributive possessive structures in Halkomelem.
Paamese language While alienable possessions are marked with a possessive constituent to which the possessive suffix attaches