Synsets for "passive"

Synset: passive_voice.n.01

Synonyms: passive_voice

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: the voice used to indicate that the grammatical subject of the verb is the recipient (not the source) of the action denoted by the verb

Examples: `The ball was thrown by the boy' uses the passive voice | `The ball was thrown' is an abbreviated passive

Lemmas: passive_voice passive

Hypernym: voice

Hyponym:

Antonyms: active_voice

    

Synset: passive.a.01

Synonyms: passive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: lacking in energy or will

Examples: Much benevolence of the passive order may be traced to a disinclination to inflict pain upon oneself"- George Meredith

Lemmas: passive inactive

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: active

    

Synset: passive.s.02

Synonyms: passive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: peacefully resistant in response to injustice

Examples: passive resistance

Lemmas: passive peaceful

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: passive.a.03

Synonyms: passive

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: expressing that the subject of the sentence is the patient of the action denoted by the verb

Examples: academics seem to favor passive sentences

Lemmas: passive

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: active

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Passive voice In Japanese, for example, the adversative passive (also called indirect passive) indicates adversative affect. The indirect or adversative passive has the same form as the direct passive. Unlike the direct passive, the indirect passive may be used with intransitive verbs.
English passive voice Passive writing is not necessarily slack and indirect. Many famously vigorous passages use the passive voice, as in these examples with the passive verbs italicized:
English passive voice For example, despite Orwell's advice to avoid the passive, his "Politics and the English Language" employs passive voice for about 20 percent of its constructions. By comparison, a statistical study found about 13 percent passive constructions in newspapers and magazines.
Uses of English verb forms For further details of passive constructions, see English passive voice.
Impersonal passive voice Venetian has the impersonal passive voice, also called intransitive passive, since it is built from intransitive verbs.
Passive-aggressive behavior Increased public exposure to the term has led to websites like "Passive-Aggressive Notes", which uploads purportedly passive-aggressive emails, notes and signs, although many of the examples are not correctly passive-aggressive in nature.
Passivity (engineering) A component that is not passive is called an active component. An electronic circuit consisting entirely of passive components is called a passive circuit (and has the same properties as a passive component). Used out-of-context and without a qualifier, the term passive is ambiguous. Typically, analog designers use this term to refer to incrementally passive components and systems, while control systems engineers will use this to refer to thermodynamically passive ones.
Passive margin A fourth way to classify passive margins is according to the nature of sedimentation of the mature passive margin. Sedimentation continues throughout the life of a passive margin. Sedimentation changes rapidly and progressively during the initial stages of passive margin formation because rifting begins on land, becoming marine as the rift opens and a true passive margin is established. Consequently, the sedimentation history of a passive margin begins with fluvial, lacustrine, or other subaerial deposits, evolving with time depending on how the rifting occurred and how, when, and by what type of sediment it varies.
English passive voice For example, "Caesar was stabbed by Brutus" is in the passive voice. The subject, "Caesar", indicates the person acted upon. The agent is expressed here with the phrase "by Brutus", but this can be omitted. The equivalent sentence in the active voice is "Brutus stabbed Caesar", in which the subject denotes the doer, or agent, Brutus. A sentence featuring the passive voice is sometimes called a "passive sentence", and a verb phrase in passive voice is sometimes called a "passive verb".
English passive voice A "bare passive clause" is similar to a typical passive clause, but without the passive auxiliary verb (so it is a non-finite clause consisting of a subject together with a verb phrase based on a past participle with the passive construction). These can be used in such contexts as newspaper headlines:
Latin conjugation Add the passive endings to form the passive voice. The passive "portor" can be translated as "I am carried," or "I am being carried".
Behavioral communication There are four different types of communication behavior: aggressive, assertive, passive, and passive-aggressive.
Sotho verbs The suffix may be either (Proto-Bantu *-u-) (short passive) or (long passive).
Latin conjugation There are four participles: present active, perfect passive, future passive, and future active.
English passive voice Some verbs are used almost exclusively in the passive voice. This is the case with "rumor", for example. The following passive sentences are possible:
Passive integrator circuit Passive integrator circuit is a simple four-terminal network consisting of two passive elements. It is also the simplest (first-order) low-pass filter.
Danish grammar In addition to the proper passive constructions, the passive also denotes:
Proto-Greek language The future tense is created, including a future passive as well as an aorist passive.
Infrasonic passive differential spectroscopy Infrasonic Passive Seismic Spectroscopy (IPSS) is a Passive Seismic Low Frequency technique used for mapping potential oil and gas hydrocarbon accumulations.
English passive voice Jan Freeman, a columnist for "The Boston Globe", said that the passive voice does have its uses, and that "all good writers use the passive voice."