Synsets for "parturient"

Synset: parturient.a.01

Synonyms: parturient

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: of or relating to or giving birth

Examples: parturient pangs | the parturient uterus

Lemmas: parturient

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: parturient.s.02

Synonyms: parturient

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: giving birth

Examples: a parturient heifer

Lemmas: parturient

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

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Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
No Pain Labor & Delivery – Global Health Initiative 3. Decrease in Cesarean Delivery Rates in Three High Risk Parturient Population
Rescue 911 (pinball) The gameplay features some disaster rescue scenarios e.g. saving people from wildfires and flash floods and emergency medical missions such as delivering a parturient mother in a nearby hospital.
Richard Manningham In 1739 Manningham established a ward in the parochial infirmary of St. James's, Westminster, for parturient women, the first ward of the kind established in Great Britain; he lectured there on midwifery. He died 11 May 1759 at Chelsea and was buried there. Thomas Denman praised Manningham as "successful in practice and very humane in the exercise of his art".
Cotswold sheep Cotswold lambs are very hardy once dried off after birth. They have small heads at birth, if the ewes are not overfed during gestation, and therefore are more easily born than some breeds. Cotswold ewes usually have a "narrow flank," once thought of as weakness, until it was observed that this characteristic assists in directing parturient lambs towards a "normal" birth presentation.
No Pain Labor & Delivery – Global Health Initiative Neuraxial labor analgesia is commonly available in high-income countries. These techniques have been shown to be safe and effective for alleviating labor pain. Neuraxial analgesia is associated with improved maternal and neonatal outcomes and has been recommended by American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) and The Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP) as a proactive approach for high-risk parturient safety during labor., In contrast, a 2007 study reported that neuraxial labor analgesia was used by <1% of parturients in China.
Monthly nurse A monthly nurse could earn more than a midwife as the monthly nurse was employed for periods between 10 days and often much longer and might attend several women on a part time basis. She often “lived in”. The midwife’s only duty was perceived as “being trained to assist the parturient woman while nature does her own work and able to call upon a surgeon who could step in where nature fails and skill and science are required”. Many certified midwives transferred to the ranks of monthly nurses to benefit from an increased income.
Milk fever Milk fever, postparturient hypocalcemia, or parturient paresis is a disease, primarily in dairy cattle, but also seen in beef cattle, characterized by reduced blood calcium levels (see: Hypocalcemia). It occurs following parturition, at onset of lactation, when demand for calcium for colostrum production exceeds the body’s ability to mobilize calcium. “Fever” is a misnomer, as body temperature during the disease is generally not elevated. Milk fever is more commonly seen in older animals (which have reduced ability to mobilize calcium from bone) and in certain breeds (such as Channel Island breeds).
The Mountain in Labour The line from Horace's poem ("Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus") is reproduced word for word in a mediaeval compilation of fables, the "Ysopet-Avionnet". In this instance, however, it is in connection with the fable about Belling the cat where the author comments on the ineffectiveness of political dialogue. In his prose retelling ("The Mountains in Labour", Fable 26), Samuel Croxall also draws from it a warning against the promises of politicians and cites 'Great cry and little wool' as a parallel English proverb that fits the situation. In the 19th century it was also given a political application under the title 'The Mountain of Horace' in an American political cartoon by Thomas Nast satirising the supporters of Horace Greeley in the presidential election of 1872. It depicts Greeley as a mouse emerging from a pile of mud labeled "Liberal Mountain."
Mountain goat Daily movements by individual mountain goats are primarily confined to areas on the same mountain face, drainage basin, or alpine opening. Daily movements reflect an individual’s needs for foraging, resting, thermoregulation and security from predators or disturbance. Seasonal movements primarily reflect nutritional needs (e.g., movements to and from mineral licks/salt lick), reproductive needs (i.e., movement of pre-parturient females to “kidding” areas; movement to rutting areas), and climatic influences (i.e., movement to areas in response to foraging conditions). In general, seasonal movements are likely to exhibit a strong elevational component, whereby lower, forested elevations are used during the spring-summer (security cover effects) to access lower elevation mineral licks, and during winter (thermal cover effects) to access forage. The farthest movements are expected to be by dispersing mountain goats. Such movements are likely to involve mountain goats crossing forested valleys as they move between mountain blocks.
No Pain Labor & Delivery – Global Health Initiative The nongovernmental No Pain Labor & Delivery - Global Health Initiative (NPLD-GHI), established and designed to educate Chinese women and their health care providers about the safe and effective use of labor analgesia, was developed at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in 2006. After its first trip in 2008, >500 volunteers participated in NPLD-GHI from the United States, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Israel, and China by 2016. These individuals include physician anesthesiologists, obstetricians (including maternal-fetal medicine specialists), neonatologists, midwives, labor and delivery nurses, senior anesthesiology residents/fellows, interpreters, and other volunteers. More than 200 lectures have been given as part of NPLD-GHI's educational program. Participants of NPLD-GHI co-hosted weekend conferences have increased from <100 in 2008 to just under 3000 in 2016 (6 conference sites). In recent years, NPLD-GHI members have participated in up to 15 obstetric and obstetric anesthesia conferences annually. Approximately 300 attendees participate each month in each Modern L&D Virtual Lecture Hall.The 55 participating hospitals cover care for a parturient population of approximately 500,000 annually. The Obstetric Anesthesia Infrastructure Development (OAID) project was initiated at 31 hospitals in 25 cities from 2008 to 2016. The annual number of hospital sites visited increased from 1 in 2008 to 6 in 2016. Since 2014, 6 additional hospitals each year have participated in the Obstetric Anesthesia Support (OAS) project to meet the local increased demands. Furthermore, its Private Hospital (PH) Project has been initiated since Sept. 2015.
James Young Simpson In 1847, Simpson first demonstrated the properties of chloroform upon humans, during an experiment with friends in which he learnt that it could be used to put one to sleep. Dr Simpson and two of his friends, Drs Keith and Duncan, used to sit every evening in Dr Simpson's dining room to try new chemicals to see if they had any anaesthetic effect. On 4 November 1847 they decided to try a ponderous material named chloroform that they had previously ignored. On inhaling the chemical they found that a general mood of cheer and humour had set in. But suddenly all of them collapsed only to regain consciousness the next morning. Simpson knew, as soon as he woke up, that he had found something that could be used as an anaesthetic. They soon had Miss Petrie, Simpson's niece, try it. She fell asleep soon after inhaling it while singing the words, "I am an angel!". There is a prevalent myth that the mother of the first child delivered under chloroform christened her child "Anaesthesia"; the story is retailed in Simpson's biography as written by his daughter Eve. However, the son of the first baby delivered by chloroform explained that Simpson's parturient had been one Jane Carstairs, and her child was baptised Wilhelmina. "Anaesthesia" was a nickname Simpson had given the baby.