Synsets for "crapulous"

Synset: crapulent.s.01

Synonyms: crapulent

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: suffering from excessive eating or drinking

Examples: crapulent sleep | a crapulous stomach

Lemmas: crapulent crapulous

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: crapulous.s.02

Synonyms: crapulous

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE SATELLITE

Definition: given to gross intemperance in eating or drinking

Examples: a crapulous old reprobate

Lemmas: crapulous

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Ghosts (play) Upon being produced in England in 1891, the play was reviled in the press. In a typical review at the time, "The Daily Telegraph" referred to it as "Ibsen's positively abominable play entitled "Ghosts"... An open drain: a loathsome sore unbandaged; a dirty act done publicly... Gross, almost putrid indecorum... Literary carrion... Crapulous stuff".
Thomas Paine Loyalists vigorously attacked "Common Sense"; one attack, titled "Plain Truth" (1776), by Marylander James Chalmers, said Paine was a political quack and warned that without monarchy, the government would "degenerate into democracy." Even some American revolutionaries objected to "Common Sense"; late in life John Adams called it a "crapulous mass." Adams disagreed with the type of radical democracy promoted by Paine (that men who did not own property should still be allowed to vote and hold public office), and published "Thoughts on Government" in 1776 to advocate a more conservative approach to republicanism.
À rebours The Catholic writer Léon Bloy praised the novel, describing Huysmans as "formerly a Naturalist, but now an Idealist capable of the most exalted mysticism, and as far removed from the crapulous [gluttonous or drunken] Zola as if all the interplanetary spaces had suddenly accumulated between them." In his review, Barbey d'Aurevilly compared Huysmans to Baudelaire, recalling: "After "Les Fleurs du mal" I told Baudelaire it only remains for you to choose between the muzzle of the pistol and the foot of the Cross. But will the author of "À rebours" make the same choice?" His prediction eventually proved true when Huysmans converted to Catholicism in the 1890s.
William Cowper Brann He was particularly noted for his writings attacking religious conservatism. "I have nothing against the Baptists. I just believe they were not held under long enough" (Conger, 1964, "Baptism by Immersion"). Brann also devoted many paragraphs to the attack of the wealthy eastern social elites, such as the Vanderbilt family, and deplored their marriages to titled Europeans. He characterized such marriages as diluting the elites' already-debased American stock with worthless foreign blood. He was equally critical of the New York social scene: "Mrs. Bradley-Martin's sartorial kings and pseudo-queens have strutted their brief hour on the stage, disappearing at daybreak like foul night-birds or an unclean dream—have come and gone like the rank eructation of some crapulous Sodom... a breath blown from the festering lips of half-forgotten harlots..." (Brann, 1897).
Sir Robert Hutchison, 1st Baronet Hutchison was tall, gaunt and appeared rather stooping. His students found his wit to be "caustic" sometimes, reaching "towards sadism in such alliterative condemnations of themselves as a curious collection of crapulous cretins creeping from crib to crib", and making "a newcomer cringe with such reminders as that 'he was percussing a child’s lung not the cellars in the basement'". Yet, his students respected and admired him because, they "sensed that his individual method of teaching was really in part a pose, an assumption of cynicism, that failed to hide a mind that was intellectually gay and a heart that felt deeply for all human suffering, especially the sufferings of children, though seldom for the sufferings of a candidate for the College Membership".
Jim Shaw (artist) In 2000, Jim Shaw staged a show at the ICA, London, of "Thrift Store Paintings"—paintings he had collected by (mostly anonymous) amateur artists in America. Some reactions to this show included Adrian Searle of the "The Guardian" stating "The paintings are awful, indefensible, crapulous…", "these people can't draw, can't paint; these people should never be left alone with a paintbrush", and "The Thrift Store Paintings are fascinating, alarming, troubled and funny. Scary too, just like America." For Sarah Kent of "Time Out": "Critics professing to be gobsmacked by these efforts can never have seen an amateur art show or walked along the railings of the Bayswater road. They should get out more." In 1999-2000, Shaw had his first major European retrospective touring at the Casino Luxembourg and at the MAMCO in Geneva.
Niels Wulfsberg Wulfsberg was born in Tønsberg, Vestfold, the son of Jacob Wulfsberg (1751–1826), merchant, bailiff, police chief and circuit judge, and his wife, Inger Helvig, "née" Seeberg (1752–97). Growing up in Åmot, Hedmark, he passed his university entrance examination, the "examen artium", in 1796. After having studied theology in Copenhagen, he arrived in Christiania in 1801, where he was appointed third priest of Our Savior's Church. He lived a dissolute life together with his wife in the centre of Christiania; a bishop once said that Wulfsberg had a "boisterous and crapulous character he daily soars into, whereby he debases himself as a man". With reducing reverence in the biblical community, he decided to open a bookstore and a printing-house in the city. In the autumn of 1807, he published 43 issues of the military periodical "Efterretninger og Opmuntringer angaaende de nærværende Krigsbegivenheder" ("News and Incentives relating to the Present War Events"), which has been considered a forerunner of the newspaper "Tiden, et offentlig Blad af blandet Indhold" ("Time, a Public Newspaper of Mixed Content"). The latter newspaper was first published on 28 January 1808, and championed secession from Denmark, either maintaining Norwegian independence with support from England, or creating a personal union with Sweden. In 1811, Wulfsberg took the initiative to establish Selskabet for Christiania Byes Vel, a heritage association for Christiania.
Marie Lloyd In 1920, Lloyd appeared twice at Hendon Magistrates Court and gave evidence of the abuse she had suffered from Dillon. Soon afterwards, she separated from him and, as a result, became depressed. When asked by prosecutors how many times Dillon had assaulted her since Christmas 1919, Lloyd replied "I cannot tell you, there were so many [occasions]. It has happened for years, time after time, always when he is drunk." By now, she was becoming increasingly unreliable on stage; she appeared at a theatre in Cardiff for a mere six minutes before being carried off by stage hands. During the performance, she seemed dazed and confused, and she stumbled across the stage. She was conscious of her weak performances and frequently cried between shows. Virginia Woolf was among the audience at the Bedford Music Hall on 8 April 1921 and described Lloyd as "A mass of corruption – long front teeth – a crapulous way of saying 'desire', and yet a born artist – scarcely able to walk, waddling, aged, unblushing."