Synsets for "acropetal"

Synset: acropetal.a.01

Synonyms: acropetal

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: of leaves or flowers; developing or opening in succession from base to apex

Examples:

Lemmas: acropetal

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: basipetal

    

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Acropetal Technologies The founder of the company Mr. D Ravi Kumar now holds the position of Chairman-cum-Managing Director of the company. Mr. Subbu Iyer holds the designation of CEO of the company's US counterpart, Acropetal Inc. The CEO of the Indian counterpart Acropetal Technologies Ltd is not announced yet.
Acropetal Technologies Acropetal Technologies is a mid-sized business technology Solutions Company headquartered in Bangalore, India. The company operates as a provider of on-demand technology solutions across various sectors including Education, Manufacturing, Consumer Goods, Retail, Health Care. The company has offices in 4 geographies namely Asia Pac, North America, Europe and Middle East.
Acropetal Technologies Acropetal started as an Engineering Design Services company in 2001 and expanded its foray of serves to add software services capabilities and expanded its geographic presence. The company adopted an inorganic growth path and acquired many companies over the years. The acquired companies like Kinfotech Pvt. Limited, LineBeyond Inc., MindRiver Technologies Limited to improve growth.
Acropetal Technologies There are many obligations with reference to the settlement amount of various employees till date who were working for Acropetal corporate office. Although the company is progressing after the bad phase still the responsibility of settlement is not taken care which is very disappointing.
Brassinosteroid The BR is biosynthesised from campesterol. The biosynthetic pathway was elucidated by Japanese researchers and later shown to be correct through the analysis of BR biosynthesis mutants in "Arabidopsis thaliana", tomatoes, and peas. The sites for BR synthesis in plants have not been experimentally demonstrated. One well-supported hypothesis is that all tissues produce BRs, since BR biosynthetic and signal transduction genes are expressed in a wide range of plant organs, and short distance activity of the hormones also supports this. Experiments have shown that long distance transport is possible and that flow is in an acropetal direction, but it is not known if this movement is biologically relevant. Brassinosteroids are recognized at the cell membrane, although they are membrane-soluble.
ABC model of flower development An external stimulus is required in order to trigger the differentiation of the meristem into a flower meristem. This stimulus will activate mitotic cell division in the meristem, particularly on its sides where new primordia are formed. This same stimulus will also cause the meristem to follow a developmental pattern that will lead to the growth of floral meristems as opposed to vegetative meristems. The main difference between these two types of meristem, apart from the obvious disparity between the objective organ, is the verticillate (or whorled) phyllotaxis, that is, the absence of stem elongation among the successive whorls or verticils of the primordium. These verticils follow an acropetal development, giving rise to sepals, petals, stamens and carpels. Another difference from vegetative axillary meristems is that the floral meristem is «determined», which means that, once differentiated, its cells will no longer divide.
Banksia coccinea The process of flowering takes 9–12 months; the stems begin developing microscopically in spring, with no visible evidence of flower spike development for around five months before the buds actually appear. Flower spikes are in bloom from May to December or January, peaking between July and October. The distinctive inflorescences arise from the ends of one-year-old branchlets. Squat and roughly cylindrical, they are high and wide. A field study on the southern sandplains revealed an average count of around 286 individual flowers on each spike. The white flower is covered in grey or pale brown fur, and there is little variation in colour. The style is generally scarlet, but can be dark red, orange or pink. The perianth is long, while the style is long and strongly recurved or looped until they are released at anthesis. Anthesis is acropetal, that is, the flowers open from the base up the spike to the apex.
Plant development An external stimulus is required in order to trigger the differentiation of the meristem into a flower meristem. This stimulus will activate mitotic cell division in the meristem, particularly on its sides where new primordia are formed. This same stimulus will also cause the meristem to follow a developmental pattern that will lead to the growth of floral meristems as opposed to vegetative meristems. The main difference between these two types of meristem, apart from the obvious disparity between the objective organ, is the verticillate (or whorled) phyllotaxis, that is, the absence of stem elongation among the successive whorls or verticils of the primordium. These verticils follow an acropetal development, giving rise to sepals, petals, stamens and carpels. Another difference from vegetative axillary meristems is that the floral meristem is «determined», which means that, once differentiated, its cells will no longer divide.
Banksia paludosa The bark and foliage is rough and covered in multiplication signs, although the new growth is covered in fine hair. The stems are generally less than 2 cm (0.8 in) in diameter, and may be red or yellow when young. The leaves are alternate or whorled along the stems, and spear- to egg-shaped (lanceolate to obovate) in shape. They measure 4–13 cm (1.6–5.2 in) long and 1–3 cm (0.4–1.2 in) wide. The leaf margins are entire or have occasional serrations. The leaf undersurface is white, with a midrib. Flowering occurs over autumn and winter (April to July) and the flower spikes, known as inflorescences, arise from stems that are three or more years old. Cylindrical in shape, they are composed of a central woody spike or axis from which a large number of compact floral units arise perpendicularly to it, and are generally 3.2–4 cm (1.3–1.8 in) wide and 7–13 cm (2.8–5.2 in) high. The individual flowers are more openly spaced than those of other banksias, and this is especially evident in late bud. This, coupled with the tall thin shape of the flower spike, makes the species quite distinctive. The flower spikes are pale- to golden brown in bud, and open to a more gold colour after anthesis. Variations are seen, one form having a grey limb in bud, and plants with particularly tall flower spikes have been recorded near Huskisson at Jervis Bay. As with most banksias, in anthesis the opening of the individual buds proceeds up the flower spike from the base to the top (acropetal). The process from bud to the finishing of flowering takes six to eight weeks.
Banksia canei "Banksia canei" grows as a woody shrub to in height, usually with many branches. Its bark is smooth with horizontal lenticels, initially reddish-brown before fading to grey tones. The stiff leaves are arranged alternately along the stems and show significant variation in shape and size. Adult leaves are linear or narrowly obovate in shape, and generally measure , though some populations have leaves as short as or as long as . The juvenile leaves are generally larger and wider with dentate margins. New growth is seen mainly from February to April. The complex flower spikes, known as inflorescences, appear between December and May, peaking over February to April. They arise from nodes of 1–3-year-old branchlets or can be terminal. Cylindrical in shape, they are composed of a central woody spike, from which a large number of compact floral units arise perpendicularly to it. They are generally high and wide, but some do reach high. Mauve-tinted in bud, they generally open to become pale yellow in colour. As with most banksias, anthesis is acropetal; the opening of the individual buds proceeds up the flower spike from the base to the top. The flower limbs may be pale grey or blue-tinged, while the styles are yellow. As the inflorescences age, the old flowers fall away, leaving a naked spike. Up to 150 follicles develop, each covered in short fine fur which is initially pale brown but fades to green-grey and partly wears away. More or less elliptic in shape, they measure long, high, and wide, and mostly remain closed until burnt by fire, although a few may open after several years. They contain two fertile seeds each, between which lies a woody dark brown separator of similar shape to the seeds. Measuring in length, the seed is obovate, and composed of a dark brown -wide membranous 'wing' and crescent-shaped (lunate) seed proper which measures long by wide. The seed surface can be smooth or covered in tiny ridges, and often glistens. The resulting seedling first grows two obovate cotyledon leaves, which may remain for several months as several more leaves appear.
Banksia marginata The complex flower spikes, known as inflorescences, appear generally from late summer to early winter (February to June) in New South Wales and Victoria, although flowering occurs in late autumn and winter in the Gibraltar Range. Cylindrical in shape, they are composed of a central woody spike or axis, perpendicularly from which a large number of compact floral units arise, which measure tall and wide. Pale yellow in colour, they are composed of up to 1000 individual flowers (784 recorded in the Gibraltar Range) and arise from nodes on branchlets that are at least three years old. Sometimes two may grow from successive nodes in the same flowering season. They can have a grey or golden tinge in late bud. As with most banksias, anthesis is acropetal; the opening of the individual buds proceeds up the flower spike from the base to the top. Over time the flower spikes fade to brown and then grey, and the old flowers generally persist on the cone. The woody follicles grow in the six months after flowering, with up to 150 developing on a single flower spike. In many populations, only a few follicles develop. Small and elliptic, they measure long, high, and wide. In coastal and floodplain populations, these usually open spontaneously and release seed, while they generally remain sealed until burnt by fire in plants from heathland and montane habitats. Each follicle contains one or two fertile seeds, between which lies a woody dark brown separator of similar shape to the seeds. Measuring in length, the seed is egg- to wedge-shaped (obovate to cuneate) and composed of a dark brown wide membranous "wing" and wedge- or sickle-shaped (cuneate–falcate) seed proper which measures long by wide. The seed surface can be smooth or covered in tiny ridges, and often glistens. The resulting seedling first grows two obovate cotyledon leaves, which may remain for several months as several more leaves appear. The cotyledons of "Banksia marginata", "B. paludosa" and "B. integrifolia" are very similar in appearance.
Acropetal Technologies The company is headquartered in Bangalore, India and has offices at other locations including New Delhi (India), Singapore, Dubai, Germany, as well as in Texas and Massachusetts, the U.S. :