Synsets for "abducent"

Synset: abducent.n.01

Synonyms: abducent

Part of Speech: NOUN

Definition: a small motor nerve supplying the lateral rectus muscle of the eye

Examples:

Lemmas: abducent abducent_nerve abducens abducens_nerve nervus_abducens sixth_cranial_nerve

Hypernym: cranial_nerve

Hyponym:

Antonyms:

    

Synset: abducent.a.01

Synonyms: abducent

Part of Speech: ADJECTIVE

Definition: especially of muscles; drawing away from the midline of the body or from an adjacent part

Examples:

Lemmas: abducent abducting

Hypernym:

Hyponym:

Antonyms: adducent

    

Related Wikipedia Samples:

Article Related Text
Abducens nerve The Latin name for the sixth cranial nerve is nervus abducens. The "Terminologia Anatomica" officially recognizes two different English translations: abducent nerve and abducens nerve. Either term is correct.
Cavernous nerve plexus It communicates with the oculomotor, the trochlear, the ophthalmic and the abducent nerves, and with the ciliary ganglion, and distributes filaments to the wall of the internal carotid artery.
Abducens nerve The abducens nerve or abducent nerve (the sixth cranial nerve, also called the sixth nerve or simply CNVI) is a somatic efferent nerve that, in humans, controls the movement of a single muscle, the lateral rectus muscle of the eye.
Lesser wing of sphenoid bone It transmits the oculomotor nerve, the trochlear nerve, and the abducent nerve, the three branches of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, some filaments from the cavernous plexus of the sympathetic nervous system, the orbital branch of the middle meningeal artery, a recurrent branch from the lacrimal artery to the dura mater, and the ophthalmic vein.
Abducens nerve “Abducens” is more common in recent literature, while “abducent” predominates in the older literature. The United States National Library of Medicine uses “abducens nerve” in its Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) vocabulary to index the vast MEDLINE and PubMed biomedical databases. The 39th edition of "Gray’s Anatomy" (2005) also prefers “abducens nerve.”
Medial eminence of floor of fourth ventricle In the superior part of the fossa the medial eminence has a width equal to that of the corresponding half of the fossa, but opposite the superior fovea it forms an elongated swelling, the "colliculus facialis", which overlies the nucleus of the abducent nerve, and is, in part at least, produced by the internal genu of the facial nerve.
Petrosal process The petrosal process is a sharp process below the notch for the passage of the abducent nerve on either side of the dorsum sellae of the sphenoid bone. It articulates with the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone, and forms the medial boundary of the foramen lacerum.
Middle cranial fossa The sella turcica is bounded posteriorly by a quadrilateral plate of bone, the dorsum sellae, the upper angles of which are surmounted by the posterior clinoid processes: these afford attachment to the tentorium cerebelli, and below each is a notch for the abducent nerve.
Middle cranial fossa It transmits to the orbital cavity the oculomotor, the trochlear, the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal, and the abducent nerves, some filaments from the cavernous plexus of the sympathetic, and the orbital branch of the middle meningeal artery; and from the orbital cavity a recurrent branch from the lacrimal artery to the dura mater, and the ophthalmic veins.
Internal carotid plexus The internal carotid plexus communicates with the trigeminal ganglion, the abducent nerve, and the pterygopalatine ganglion (also named sphenopalatine); it distributes filaments to the wall of the internal carotid artery, and also communicates with the tympanic branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve.
Cavernous nerve plexus The branch of communication with the oculomotor nerve joins that nerve at its point of division; the branch to the trochlear nerve joins it as it lies on the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus; other filaments are connected with the under surface of the ophthalmic nerve; and a second filament joins the abducent nerve.
Body of sphenoid bone On either side of the dorsum sellae is a notch for the passage of the abducent nerve, and below the notch a sharp process, the petrosal process, which articulates with the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone, and forms the medial boundary of the foramen lacerum.
Internal carotid artery In this part of its course, the artery is situated between the layers of the dura mater forming the cavernous sinus, but covered by the lining membrane of the sinus. It at first ascends toward the posterior clinoid process, then passes forward by the side of the body of the sphenoid bone, and again curves upward on the medial side of the anterior clinoid process, and perforates the dura mater forming the roof of the sinus. The curve in the cavernous segment is called the carotid siphon. This portion of the artery is surrounded by filaments of the sympathetic trunk and on its lateral side is the abducent nerve, or cranial nerve VI.